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  1. #1
    DF VIP Member
    BigBird's Avatar
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    Default Apple facetime bug that lets users eavesdrop on others

    Apple rushes to fix facetime bug that lets users eavesdrop on others

    Firm disables Group FaceTime over serious glitch which can also turn on video without people’s knowledge

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    This cant be right. Must be false news.

    Apple products don't have serious problems. Which goes part way to explaining why the iSheep exclusively buy Apple all the time even though the products are overpriced, and why they are prepared to become assimilated into the closed ecosystem of apple where your device is much less useful if you don't own other apple devices.

    This type of utter loyalty to a multinational profit-driven company with a refusal to accept any other device can only come from an unnatural love for a product that is 100% reliable and totally free of flaws and serious security issues.

    That is why this must be false news. (">

    Thanks to BigBird

    ss30 (30th January 2019) 


  2. #2
    DF PwNagE ss30's Avatar
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    Default Re: Apple facetime bug that lets users eavesdrop on others

    It must be complete BS Apple would never let this happen.

    Can you imagine the hate from apple fan boys if this happened on Android though

  3. #3
    DF Super Moderator DJ Overdose's Avatar
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    Default Re: Apple facetime bug that lets users eavesdrop on others

    I tried to test this with no joy.

    Wonder if it only affects outdated versions of iOS or particular handsets?

    Bug like this goes nuclear because its Apple, but there are way more bugs and holes in android. Fanboys or not, there are approx' 5 times as many vulnerabilities with Android as there is with iOS.


    DJ OD
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  4. #4
    DF Super Moderator BertRoot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Apple facetime bug that lets users eavesdrop on others

    Thing with this sort of thing on either platform is look on here. All you ever see is folk, android folk, getting all antsy and yawnfully going on and on about closed ecosystem, fanboy this and that, and allsorts of other anti shit. Get over it. Do you see me diving on here every time another android fuck up is presented? No, cos to be frank I don't see it as a competition or a reason to denigrate others choices. Freedom of choice is just that and others choices in technology are their choices, not something to stop getting an erection over.

    2 Thanks given to BertRoot

    DJ Overdose (30th January 2019) 


  5. #5
    DF General DogsBody
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    Default Re: Apple facetime bug that lets users eavesdrop on others

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]


    Mother and son 'tried to warn Apple of bug'
    Dave Lee
    North America technology reporter
    29 January 2019

    Apple has disabled the group calling function of FaceTime while it pushes out its update to customer
    Apple has disabled the group calling function of FaceTime while it pushes out its update to customers

    A mother and son from Arizona tried to warn Apple about the eavesdropping FaceTime bug over a week ago.

    The flaw, which gained attention on Monday, relates to the company’s FaceTime chat function.

    Michele Thompson and her 14-year-old son made several attempts to warn the firm, but say they were mostly ignored.

    “Short of smoke signals, I was trying every method that someone could use to get a hold of someone at Apple,” Ms Thompson told the Wall Street Journal.

    Apple has not yet commented, other than to say it will push a fix out to users in the coming days. In the meantime, the company has disabled the group calling function of FaceTime.
    According to the Wall Street Journal, Ms Thompson, a lawyer, started contacting Apple on 20 January. On the 25, she posted a video on YouTube showing her and her son Grant demonstrating the flaw.
    On Monday, as news of the bug finally gained widespread attention, Ms Thompson wrote: "I have letters, emails, tweets and msgs. sent to Apple for 10+ days reporting the Group FaceTime bug that lets someone listen in. My teenager discovered it! Never heard back from them.”

    Her efforts also included using Apple’s support system to file a bug report.

    "After several emails w/ Apple, they told me I could register as a developer to submit the bug report which I did (even though I’m the farthest thing from a developer),” she wrote.

    "Also emailed it directly to product-security@apple with full details."

    'Bug bounty'

    Apple, like many technology companies, has a “bug bounty” programme that pays people for finding new bugs in its products. Ms Thompson said she hoped her son would benefit.

    "I would love for my 14-year-old to be rewarded for reporting this. Even a thanks would be amazing!”

    The flaw, first revealed by the 9to5Mac blog, appears to occur when both users are running version 12.1 of Apple's mobile operating system iOS, or newer. It also affects Mac users when they are called from an iPhone.

    The technique involves using the software's group chat function, apparently confusing the software into activating the target's microphone, even if the call has not been accepted.

    The eavesdropping ends when the call is cut after too many rings.

    Kevin Beaumont, a security researcher, told the BBC that Apple is likely to deal with a large number of bug reports, which can take time to sort through and prioritise.

    "Many companies typically aim for 90 days to resolve reported security issues, and much of that time can be spent reaching the right people and setting the right priorities.

    "It appears the mother and son attempting to report this issue were passed around departments by Apple. That isn't ideal, and something Apple needs to work on."
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