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    DF VIP Member gandalf72's Avatar
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    Default Anyone any good at harvard academic referencing for uni?

    Looking to find out how to reference multiple quotes at different points in a survey from mckinsey quarterly.

    I found a interesting article for my uni essay question that is to do with a survey conducted in 2007. There is multiple quotes from that 7 page document that I would like to lift but need to reference it harvard style.

    Anyone able to advise on how to do this please.

    Thanks in advance

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    DF PwNagE burner1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anyone any good at harvard academic referencing for uni?

    Have you read 'Harvard guide to citing references' mate? Got a copy in .DOC format if you want a read of it. I used it in my course work.

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    DF VIP Member gandalf72's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anyone any good at harvard academic referencing for uni?

    Hi burner,

    No I dont have a copy of that m8 will send you a pm cheers

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    Default Re: Anyone any good at harvard academic referencing for uni?

    Any good mate? Thought the using 'a' 'b' and 'c' reference option may have covered what you needed to do?

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    Default Re: Anyone any good at harvard academic referencing for uni?

    I'm sure it's covered in that guide burner has sent, but for 1-3 authors you reference each of them, separated by commas and an 'and'. Otherwise, use the first author (from the title page) and use 'and others' or 'et al'.

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    DF Rookie tegtegteg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Anyone any good at harvard academic referencing for uni?


    Sorry this is the only way I could think of doing it.
    Harvard guide to citing references



    The examples here follow the Open University House Style Guide, which uses a version of the Harvard system of citing references, but some OU courses may use other referencing systems. Please check the details for your course before using this guide.
    (Please note: this guide was revised in May 2010. Some of the advice on formatting references has been updated and will differ from the previous version).
    1 In-text citations

    In the Harvard system, references in the text (in-text citations) are referred to by the author’s name and year of publication, for example:
    It is stated that…(Bloggs, 2007) or Bloggs (2007) states…
    If you are directly quoting material (i.e. using the exact form of words used in the original and putting the text in quote marks), you will also need to include the page number(s) of the quoted material in your in-text citation, for example:
    Bloggs talks about ‘the importance of preparation’ for interviews (2007, p. 57).
    [IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME~1/ADMINI~1/LOCALS~1/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image001.gif[/IMG]This is also the case for quoting material for all the types of text referred to in the rest of this guide, unless page numbers are not available.
    In the reference list or bibliography, items are listed only once in alphabetical order. In some cases you may refer to more than one publication by an author for a specific year. To help identify these different items for your in-text citation and reference list, you should add a letter of the alphabet to the year of publication, for example:
    (Thomson, 2004a), (Thomson, 2004b) and (Thomson, 2004c)
    where a, b and c refer to the order in which they are cited in your text.
    When you come across a publication with 3 or more authors you only list the first author for the in-text citation followed by et al. For example:
    (Jones et al., 2007)
    but in the reference list or bibliography you would list each author in full.
    2 Reference lists

    References in the reference list or bibliography give, in alphabetical order by author surname, full details of all the sources you have used in the text, for example:


    Bourdieu, P. (1992) The Logic of Practice, Cambridge, Polity.
    Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) (2007) This Way to Better Streets: 10 Case Studies on Improving Street Design, London, CABE; also available online at [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 12 February 2009).
    Foucault, M. (1977) Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, Harmondsworth, Penguin.
    Glaskin, M. (2004) ‘Innovation: the end of the white line’, Sunday Times, 22 August, [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 12 February 2009).
    Goffman, E. (1959) The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, New York, Anchor Books.
    House of Commons (2003) Hansard, 2 July, Column 407 [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 13 February 2009).
    McNichol, T. (2004) ‘Roads gone wild’, Wired Magazine, issue 12.12, December [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 13 February 2009).
    Shared Space (2005) Shared Space: Room for Everyone, Leeuwarden, Shared Space; also available online at [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 21 February 2009).
    Thompson, K. (2003) ‘Fantasy, franchises, and Frodo Baggins: The Lord of the Rings and modern Hollywood’, The Velvet Light Trap, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 45–63.
    Ruppert, E.S. (2006) The Moral Economy of Cities: Shaping Good Citizens, Toronto, University of Toronto Press.
    3 Secondary referencing

    You may want to use a quotation or an idea from a source referenced in another work. You haven’t read the original, but have discovered it through a secondary source. This is known as ‘secondary referencing’. Ideally you should try to get hold of the original, but if you can’t then you need to make it clear in your work that you have not read the original and are referencing the secondary source, for example:
    In-text citation: Bloggs, quoted in Smith (2007) states ‘I love chocolate’ (p. 4). Or
    Bloggs, cited in Smith (2007), loves chocolate.
    In the reference list you would provide details for the source you read it in e.g.:
    Smith, J. (2007) Musings from Chocolate Lovers, Bicester, JFJ Press.
    For secondary referencing of work cited in course units, see Section 7.
    4 Books, book chapters and ebooks

    4.1 Books

    The correct format for referencing a book is: Author, A. (year of publication in brackets) Title of Book in italics, place of publication, publisher.
    Example:
    Chalke, S. (2003) How to Succeed as a Working Parent, London, Hodder & Stoughton.
    In-text citation: (Chalke, 2003) or Chalke (2003) says…
    4.2 Book chapters

    The correct format for referencing a book chapter – one written by a particular author and included in an edited book – is: Author, A. (year of publication) ‘Title of chapter’ in Editor, A. (ed) Title of Book, place of publication, publisher.
    Example:
    Mason, R. (1994) ‘The educational value of ISDN’, in Mason, R. and Bacsich, P. (eds), ISDN: Applications in Education and Training, Exeter, Short Run Press
    In-text citation: (Mason, 1994) or Mason (1994) states…
    4.3 ebooks

    The correct format for referencing an ebook is: Author, A. (year of publication) Title of Book [online], URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    Willie, S. S. (2003) Acting Black: College, Identity and the Performance of Race [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 10 April 2010)
    In-text citation: (Willie, 2003) or Willie (2003) notes that…
    4.4 ebooks on ebook readers

    The correct format for referencing an ebook used on an ebook reader (such as a Kindle reader) is: Author, A. (year of ebook publication) Title of Book [ebook], place of publication, publisher.
    Example:
    Matthews, D. J. (2010) What Cats Can Teach Us [ebook], London, Penguin.
    In-text citation: (Matthews, 2010) or Matthews (2010) notes that…
    As page numbers are not available on ebook readers, use the chapters instead for indicating the location of a quoted section:
    In-text quotation: Matthews notes that ‘kittens are often delightful’ (2010, Chapter 6)
    5 Journal and ejournal articles

    5.1 Journal article

    The correct format for referencing a journal article is: Author, A. (year of publication) ‘Title of article’, Title of Journal, volume, number, page numbers.


    Example:
    Thompson, K. (2003) ‘Fantasy, franchises, and Frodo Baggins: The Lord of the Rings and modern Hollywood’, The Velvet Light Trap, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 45–63.
    In-text citation: (Thompson, 2003) or Thompson (2003) writes that…
    5.2 ejournal articles

    The correct format for referencing an ejournal article is: Author, A. (year of publication) ‘Title of article’, Title of Journal, number, volume [online], URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    Virkus, S. (2003) ‘Information literacy in Europe: a literature review’, Information Research, vol. 8, no. 4 [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 28 October 2003).
    In-text citation: (Virkus, 2003) or Virkus (2003) states…
    6 URLs for ejournals

    For electronic journal articles you are advised to put the name of the service the item is from, or the URL. Some databases and electronic journals provide persistent URLs. This is a URL that should get you direct to the article – use this if given. Other journal articles may have a digital object identifier (DOI). Again, this is a unique address to find the article and if you have this put that beside the ‘available from’ information. If neither of these apply, and your article is from a database, we would recommend just listing the name of the database you got it from. This is because if you copy the address from the database, it is unlikely to work for someone else using it to find the article.
    7 OU course materials

    7.1 Course texts

    The correct format for referencing a course text is: The Open University as the author, (year of publication in brackets), course code plus Course title (in italics, capitalise the first word of the course title only), unit, ‘unit title in single quotes’, place of publication, publisher.
    Example:
    The Open University (1984) T281 Basic physical science for technology, Unit 9, ‘Thermochemistry’, Milton Keynes, The Open University.
    In-text citation: (T281, Unit 9).
    7.2 Copublished course texts

    The correct format for referencing a copublished course text (i.e. a text produced by The Open University and another publisher together) is: Author, A. (year of publication in brackets), Title of Book in italics, place of publication of first publisher, publisher/place of publication of second publisher, publisher.
    Example:
    Hall, S. and Gieben, B. (eds) (1992) Formations of Modernity, Cambridge, Polity Press/Milton Keynes, The Open University.
    In-text citation: (Hall and Gieben, 1992) or Hall and Gieben (1992) claim...
    7.3 Course readers

    The correct format for referencing a course reader (i.e. a collection of previously published articles) is: Author, A. (year of publication of reader) ‘Title of article’ in Editor, A. (ed) Title of Reader, place of publication, publisher.
    Example:
    Hall, S. (2000) ‘Who needs ‘identity’?’ in du Gay, P., Evans, J., and Redman, P. (eds) Identity: a Reader, London, Sage.
    In-text citation: (Hall, 2000) or Hall (2000) states…
    7.4 Course DVDs

    The correct format for referencing a course DVD is: The Open University as the author, (year of publication in brackets), course code plus Course title (in italics, capitalise the first word of the course title only), ‘DVD number and title’, place of publication, publisher.
    Example:
    The Open University (2008) T320 E-business technologies: foundations and practice, ‘DVD 1: video case studies’, Milton Keynes, The Open University
    In-text citation: (T320, DVD 1).
    7.5 Secondary referencing of work cited in course units

    If you wish to cite an author whose work is discussed in a course unit but you haven’t read the original, you need to make this clear in what you write. For example:
    In text citation: ‘Porter (cited in B820, Unit 2, p. 19) identifies…’
    In this example, citing Porter without a date is taken to mean that Porter’s original work has not been consulted.
    In the references list you would provide details only for the source you have actually read:
    The Open University (2006) B820 Strategy, Unit 2, ‘Analysing the external environment’, Milton Keynes, The Open University.
    8 Newspaper articles: print and online

    8.1 Newspaper: print

    The correct format for referencing a printed newspaper article is: Author, A. (year of publication) ‘Title of the article’, Title of the Newspaper, date, page number.
    Example:
    Mackay, C. (2002) ‘Alert over big cat’, The Daily Mirror, 4 July, p. 28.
    In-text citation: (Mackay, 2002) or Mackay (2002) states…
    8.2 Newspaper: online

    The correct format for referencing an online newspaper article is: Author, A. (year of publication) ‘Title of the article’, Title of the Newspaper, date, [online] URL (date accessed).


    Example:
    MacLeod, D. (2007) ‘Oxbridge trainee teachers twice as likely to get jobs’, Guardian, 3 August, [online] [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 3 August 2007).
    In text citation: (MacLeod, 2007) or MacLeod (2007) states…
    9 Reports

    The correct format for referencing a report is: Author, A. (year of report), Title, Issuing Organisation, report number.
    Example:
    Halliday, J. (1995) Assessment of the accuracy of the DTI’s database of the UK wind speeds, Energy Technology Support Unit, ETSU-W-11/00401/REP.
    In-text citation: (Halliday, 1995) or Halliday (1995) states…
    10 Conference papers

    The correct format for referencing a conference paper is: Author, A. (year of publication) ‘Title of paper’, Title of Conference, location, date of conference, place of publication, publisher, page numbers.
    Example:
    Jones, J. (1994), ‘Polymer blends based on compact disc scrap’, Proceedings of the Annual Technical Conference – Society of Plastics Engineers, San Francisco, May 1–5 1994, Brookfield, CT, Society of Plastics Engineers, pp. 2865–7.
    In-text citation: (Jones, 1994) or Jones (1994) states…
    11 Theses

    The correct format for referencing a thesis is: Author, A. (year of submission) Title: Subtitle, Degree Statement, place of publication, awarding institution.
    Example:
    Morishita, M. (2003) Empty museums: Transculturation and the development of public art museums in Japan, Unpublished PhD thesis, Milton Keynes, Open University.
    In-text citation: (Morishita, 2003) or Morishita (2003) claims…
    12 Online documents, personal sites, blogs, podcasts and wikipedia

    12.1 Online documents

    The correct format for referencing an online document is: Author, A. (year of publication if given) Title of Document [online], place of publication, publisher, URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    Spitzer, K. L., Eisenberg, M. B. and Lowe, C. A. (1998) Information Literacy: Essential Skills for the Information Age [online], Syracuse, NY, ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology, Syracuse University (ED 427 780) [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 28 October 2003).
    In-text citation: (Spitzer et al., 1998) or Spitzer et al. (1998) state…
    12.2 Personal or organisational websites

    The correct format for referencing a personal or organisational website is: Author, A (year of publication/last updated) Title of Website [online], URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    Open University Library (2005) Welcome to the Open University Library [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 2 February 2010).
    In text citation: (Open University Library, 2005) or Open University Library (2005) states…
    12.3 Blogs

    The correct format for referencing a blog is: Author, A. (year of publication/last updated), ‘Title of message’, Title of Website, day/month of posted message [online], URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    Sloniowski, L. (2005) ‘Because sharing is nice’, Information Literacy in Canada, 30 June [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 2 February 2009).
    In text citation: (Sloniowski, 2005) or Sloniowski (2005) states…
    Note: Some blog authors may choose to remain anonymous by using an alias. Use this instead of surname and initials if that is all that is available.
    12.4 Podcasts

    The correct format for referencing a podcast is: Title of podcast (year of publication), podcast type, podcaster, place of podcast [online], URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    The wings of a butterfly (2005), podcast radio programme, ABC Radio National, Sydney [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 16 September 2005).
    In text citation: (The wings of a butterfly, 2005) or in The wings of a butterfly (2005) it is said…
    12.5 Wikipedia

    The correct format for referencing a Wikipedia entry is: Author, A (year of publication/last updated) Title of entry [online], URL (date accessed).
    Example:
    Wikipedia (2009) Hawaiian tropical rainforests [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 5 October 2010).
    In text citation: (Wikipedia, 2009) or Wikipedia (2009)
    13 Images: online images and works of art

    13.1 Online images

    The correct format for referencing an online image is: Title of Image (year of publication) [online], URL (date accessed).

    Example:
    Mary of Modena, fleeing with her son James Francis Edward Stewart (c.1688) [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 2 February 2006).
    In text citation: When looking at the image Mary of Modena, fleeing with her son James Francis Edward Stewart (c.1688), it is obvious that…
    13.2 Works of art

    The correct format for referencing a work of art is: Artist, A. (year of production), Title of Image, medium, size, location.
    Example:
    Horan, D. (2002) Kipper in the Cat’s Mouth, watercolour, 20 x 30 cm, National Gallery, London.
    In text citation: (Horan, 2002) or Horan (2002) demonstrates…
    14 Messages: emails and forums

    14.1 emails

    The correct format for referencing an email is: Author, A. (date of message) ‘Subject of message’, email to recipient’s name.
    Example:
    Knight, C. J. (29 May 2007) ‘Cumbrian windfarms’, email to J. Q. Parker-Knoll.
    In text citation: (Knight, 2007) or Knight (2007) states…
    Note: You should always check with the author of the email that they are happy for you to use the content of the email before using the material.
    14.2 Forum messages

    The correct format for referencing a forum message is: Author, A. (date of message) ‘Subject of message’ message to Name of the Forum.
    Example:
    Burrage, R. (10 August 2004) ‘Virus information’, message to OU Service News.
    In text citation: (Burrage, 2004) or Burrage (2004) states…
    Note: You should always check with the author of the forum message that they are happy for you to use the content of the forum message before using the material.
    15 Audiovisual material: TV programmes, films and YouTube

    15.1 TV programme

    The correct format for referencing an TV programme is: Title of Programme (year) channel, date of transmission.
    Example:
    The Apprentice (2008) BBC 1, 11 June.
    In text citation: Sir Alan Sugar (The Apprentice, 2008) exemplifies…
    If you are accessing the programme online, e.g. via BBC iplayer, then you would amend the reference as follows:
    The Apprentice (2008) BBC 1, 14 June [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 16 June 2008).
    15.2 Film

    The correct format for referencing a film is: Title of Film, film, directed by Director Name, place of distribution, distribution company, year of distribution.
    Example:
    Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, film, directed by Peter Jackson, New York, Newline Productions Inc, 2003.
    In-text citation: The animation of the Ents (Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, 2003) is a good example of …
    15.3 YouTube item

    The correct format for referencing a YouTube item is: Title of Item (year of distribution), YouTube video, added by name of who uploaded it [online], URL, (date accessed).
    Example:
    Google Privacy: A Look at Cookies (2008) YouTube video, added by googleprivacy [online], [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (Accessed 12 June 2008).
    In-text citation: Maile Ohye discusses (Google Privacy: A Look at Cookies, 2008)…

    Thanks to tegtegteg

    andyinlondon (14th September 2012) 


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